9 disruptive business models – new opportunities for companies

Consider changing the business model with changing economies around you

Disrupt or be disrupted

Many companies today are confronted with this mantra. One has to see again and again that there are facets and patterns that repeat themselves. There are usually never completely new business models. Existing business models are usually simply used for a new industry, a new product or a new service.

As an example, one can also see here how certain industries have already had to deal with a disruptive business model. So the classic taxi service was put under a lot of pressure by Uber, as they had a platform and connected the drivers and guests via the Internet, instead of dialing a new number in each city or looking for taxis.

Successful disruptive business models often focus on the customer again. New technologies have changed customer behavior and thus this change also enables models that meet these needs. Subscription models, platforms and many more are worth mentioning.

Another principle is also important. Many successful companies also combine these business models and use different models for different parts of their companies. The right combination of innovative products and innovative business models can play a major role in success.

Here you can see 9 important business models that can be disruptive for industries and that everyone should at least be familiar with.

9 disruptive business models for companies

1. Freemium Model

One of the most frequently used business models. The consumer receives a product or service free of charge. Either only basic functions are offered and for premium functions, no branding or extension of the services, the customer must then pay. This way you can quickly reach a broad customer base.

This model is especially applicable for products or services that have low marginal costs (additional costs per additional customer) or where marketing and customer information have a higher value than the operating costs.

Typical examples: Spotify, Linkedin, Xing, Canva.com, MailChimp

2. Subscription Model

Products and services can usually also be offered as subscriptions. An amount that would normally only occur once is split or a new service is created that is billed periodically. The aim is to bind the customer in the long term. In contrast to the one-time purchase, the customer benefits from improvements and extensions of the service.

Non-divisible products can also be converted into a subscription here. Amazon has already provided an example with this system of how products such as detergents, cosmetics, etc. can also be delivered automatically on a regular basis.

Typical examples: Amazon, Netflix

3. Free offerings

A model that has gained in popularity especially through Google. For many entrepreneurs, this is also the most incomprehensible business model, but it has great potential for some services. Since such business models usually evaluate customer data for advertising or personalized offers, it is interesting to use a lot of information about customers.

Typical examples: Google, Facebook

4. Marketplace Model

For some industries, marketplaces already had or have great disruptive potential. The business model used here is usually a digital marketplace which connects seller and buyer on a common platform. Money is usually generated via brokerage fees, commissions or fixed transaction costs. However, it is also possible to use membership fees on the platform or to generate money through advertising.

Typical examples: Amazon, Alibaba, Uber, eBay

5. Sharing Economy – Access-over-Ownership Model – Renting & Leasing

In the classic sense, the sharing economy is referred to as letting. Goods or services that can usually only be purchased are made available to another person for a limited period of time. There is the example of car sharing. The car is made available for a certain period of time and a number of km for another person against payment. In general, this can be applied to all products, whether from private individuals or companies, real estate or intangible assets.

Typical examples: AirBnB, Sharoo, Mobility, Lyft

6. User Experience Premium

This is a premium model that can be easily observed using Apple. A good customer experience adds value to an exchangeable product. Service, the brand and especially the experience of the customer are improved and premium prices are charged.

Typical examples: Tesla, Apple und Premium-Marken

7. Pyramid Model

The model is a typical sales model that has been available for years. Especially due to the easy billing by technical aids, these pyramids models can be quickly built up and easily managed. It is especially interesting for products with high margins and which can be easily explained.

Typical examples: Amazon Affiliate, Microsoft, Dropbox

8. Ecosystem – Create your own ecosystem

To bind customers to an ecosystem in the long term through a “lock-in” process in a service is a dream for every entrepreneur. For example, if you have a mobile phone from Apple or with Android, you are probably included in this ecosystem. You buy hardware and use software that may only be compatible in the same system. This makes the change difficult and also prevents new competition from gaining a foothold.

Typical examples: Apple, Google

9. On-Demand Model

Time is money, that is the structure of this business model. The immediate access is sold or also the premium access to “time”. The delivery, the product or the service can be called up at a certain point in time. Video-on-demand, taxi (over) on-demand and many other systems are a good example. Companies or persons with goods or time provide their services for persons without goods and time but with money.

Typical examples: Amazon Prime, Uber, Upwork

Serien-Unternehmer seit er erfolgreich mit 13 Jahren die ersten Firmen gründete. Seit jeher hinterfrägt er den «Status Quo» und setzt sich für Innovation, Disruption und neue Ideen ein. Als internationaler Keynote-Speaker, Berater für Firmen und Staaten, Dozent und veröffentlichter Digital Transformation Experte versucht Benjamin international die Themen der Digitalisierung, digitalen Transformation und Innovation voranzutreiben.

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